Interview with Katie White from Royalty Soaps

When I became interested in soap making I watched Katie White's youtube channel with intensity (before she became Carson). Katie is funny, charming and delightful AND I was learned about soap. That is magic, to teach without someone knowing they are being taught. Katie sprinkles magic in all she does and has a unique voice that is not lost in all her activities.

Katie has accomplished much and has a generous heart; because of this I wanted to highlight her. Here she is: Miss (now Mrs.) Katie White - Carson from Royalty Soaps! 

Katie Carson Royalty Soaps 

When did you know soap making was for you? 

I was first introduced to soap making when I was about 11 but didn’t experiment with cold process until high school when I took a class at my home school co-op. I had read “Soap: Making it, Enjoying It” by Ann Bramson a year or two prior and I was extremely excited to try it. While I can’t remember exactly what my first soap was (pretty sure it was just a scented, uncolored batch poured into a PVC pipe) I do remember that cutting that loaf with my kitchen knife, feeling pleased as punch, and thinking “I want to make 50 of these!”. By the end of the semester, I knew I wanted to do soap making as a career.

How did you create your signature style soaps? (Not the specifics, but how did this come about?)

I had watched Karen from Eden’s Secret pipe soap cupcakes and I loved the foody appearance of bath products in general. I figured there was no reason I couldn’t pipe onto the top of regular loaves and cut them up like normal so I made a few batches with the piping tips I had on hand and a recipe I found online and was hooked. From then on I worked at perfecting my piping recipe and quite frankly was never interested in anything but high tops from there on out! Katie Carson Royalty Soaps

What makes you happy to get out of bed regarding soap making? 

I love that each batch is different no matter how many loaves of soap you make. It makes every day feel like a brand new adventure.

What were your hopes for creating your soap business?

Royalty Soap’s started as a way for me to fiscally maintain my growing hobby. I started the business aspect at 17-years old and was hoping to save enough money to buy a used car and maybe set a little aside for whatever future I might have as an adult living outside of their parent’s house. As I continued to grow, I transitioned from hobby to very small business with the intention of reaching more people with soapy love and providing an affordable luxury. I feel I have achieved my ultimate goal and for that I’m very grateful. On a smaller scale, I also hoped to be interviewed for the Soap Queen Blog, work alongside one of my favorite suppliers, and reach 10k subscribers on YouTube. I’ve seen all these come to pass so everything from here on out is sprinkles on top! J

What are your favorite parts of soap making? 

I LOVE mixing the micas into the raw soap batter, piping the tops and putting in the embeds (of course!), removing the first cut bar, and collecting the products that have been purchased to put in boxes! Katie Carson Royalty Soaps

Do you have concerns and/or hopes for the soap industry?

My main concern for the soap industry is the drive for financial success becoming more important than kindness among peers, honesty with customers, and giving others the benefit of the doubt. I’ve seen the internet soap community become more competitive and petty over the last few years but my hope is that we will revert to being a community of friendly, helpful individuals with a true passion for our craft and dedication to supporting others.

What do you want people to know about your work? 

My work is labor of love. It takes a LOT of time to create my artisan soap loaves and I dedicate hours to each one, thinking about every individual bar and holding it to “royal standards”. I want people to know that when they purchase from me, they will receive a gift worthy piece of soapy art that I created because I love what I do and want others to feel happy inside. That’s also why I publish YouTube videos, to bring others joy and hopefully brighten up their day with a little silliness and a whole lot of pretty!

What are your favorite parts to making soap? (Colors, fragrance oils, research, whatever inspires you.)

I’m a HUGE fragrance oil junky. I like to think I’ve probably smelled 50+ vanilla variations and have way too many in my storage area. Fragrances are my favorite but a close second are vivid colorants. I’m not a fan of micas that require you to dump the whole bottle in for a decent shade to appear. I want to be able to add a teaspoon to a large bucket and it color the whole thing turquoise. When I find that level of pigmentation, it makes my heart sing! haha

Are there things about soap making that you hope to pass on to your children?

Oh, absolutely! Soap making requires dedication, determination, a good work ethic, patience, and a love for your art, all of which I think are essentials for children to be exposed to. Of course I intend on using soap making as a science lesson too! There are so many different things this craft teaches us and hey! Maybe if we’re lucky, Royalty Soaps’ will become a family business. J 

What makes you laugh about making soap?

I would say soap’s ability to go wrong even when you think you’ve done everything right. Instead of getting angry when a soap I’ve made five times already decides to separate and never get back together again, I laugh in its face and try again. It’s a constant war it would seem. It also gives me a giggle every time I think about how much attention my soap gets, especially on YouTube. I still don’t fully understand why it’s so entertaining to watch someone else make something you clean your body with, but apparently it is and that baffles me while making me laugh too!

What do you want readers to know about you or your soap making business?

You can find me over on my blog, Facebook page, YouTube channel, Twitter, Instagram and purchase my products in my Etsy shop!

Watch Katie work with her Sorcery Soap Creations here: